Village Volunteer Health Advocate Program

By Jina Taub

Have you ever left your doctor’s office not sure of what steps to take next? Ever felt your concerns were not heard by medical professionals? Or maybe you could just use a helping hand with making appointments and navigating the health system?

The Village is piloting a new volunteer health advocate (VHA) program for all Village members. Members responded to the 2015 Village survey expressing interest in receiving assistance with medical or health issues which have not historically been offered by the Village. The Village board and staff took this information to heart and have worked hard to create a volunteer health advocate program, and are hopeful that it will be a valued service for members and volunteers alike.

What is a health advocate?
A health advocate is someone who provides support and assistance for a person in navigating and understanding the health care system in order to meet their health care needs.

WASHAAWho is a Village health advocate?
VHAs are Village volunteers who have completed several hours of health advocacy training, through the Washington State Health Advocacy Association (WASHAA) are are dedicated to helping members with health and medical needs. VHAs do not necessarily have a medical background, nor are they medical professionals. To date, we have seven volunteers who have completed the training.

What does a Village health advocate do?
Some activities a VHA can do include:
•   Attending medical appointments and taking notes
•   Helping to make medical appointments
•   Helping to organize personal medical information
•   Supporting you in your health care goals and needs

What doesn’t a Village health advocate do?
•   Does not give medications
•   Does not perform any medical procedures
•   Does not give any medical advice

How can I request a Village health advocate?
If you are interested in learning more about the VHA program, or requesting services, please contact Jina, Alex, or Rebecca in the Village office by phone (206.789.1217) or by email: village@phinneycenter.org.

Thank you for your interest in this program. I hope to together we continue develop a volunteer health advocate program that is beneficial and meaningful to members in our community.

·     ·     ·

Jina Taub

Author Jina Taub is a PNA Village volunteer and registered nurse (RN). Jina is the volunteer program manager for the Village health advocate program. Seven Village volunteers recently completed the program’s first volunteer training session.

 

 

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New Village Faces

Rebecca photo (1)

Hello, PNA Village!

I’m Rebecca Fogarty, the new Village Program Coordinator. I am so excited to be a part of this wonderful program and to get to know all of you. In the few shorts months since I started this position you’ve all really made me feel at home.

I’m a small town girl, originally from rural Virginia. I’m used to having cows and horses for neighbors so this big city living has been an adjustment for me. My husband and I moved to Seattle about 9 years ago and we have lived in the Phinneywood neighborhood for all but one of those years. I have such a deep love and respect for this neighborhood and I never want to leave. I am thrilled to give back to the neighborhood that has given so much to me.

I have a 5-year-old son who lovingly takes most of my free time. But when I’m not playing hide and seek or roughhousing, I love to go for runs in the neighborhood, garden, read, and eat out (way too often) at our local restaurants. So look for me because I’m always out and about. That might be me running right past your house!

If you happen to be around, please stop by the Village office. I’d love to chat with you!


Riana's baby 2

Riana Nolet gave birth to a baby girl, named Lucie Vogeli Anderson, at 5:54am Tuesday, June 14, 2016. Baby Lucie weighed 7 lbs. 13 oz. and measured 20” long. Vogeli is Riana’s Swiss mother’s maiden name and means “little bird” in Swiss-German. Mother and baby are doing well.

 

 

 

 

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Guns

By Marilyn Zuckerman

The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the PNA. Please feel free to comment and join the conversation.  

Glock 22

The Seattle Public Library Permits Concealed Guns

Nobody asked me
if I wanted to sit next to a guy
carrying a gun
he can pull out at any time
something triggers his paranoia—
a suspicious movement,
a foreign face
or the librarian who has asked him to be quiet.
It’s the moment he’s been waiting for
ever since he bought the gun,
learned to use it at the shooting range
banging away at a moving silhouette
wearing a sign that says
KILL ME.

·    ·    ·

Shoot ‘em Ups

In the old west
the shoot ‘em up takes place in town—
in the old saloon, the brothel
or the boardwalk outside the barbershop—

These days, it can be anywhere
the church
the synagogue
a shopping mall
post office
your office building
a college dorm
the library or on the road.
Not with a Colt 45
but an AR-15 blazing at so many rounds a second,
the shooter—your husband or the boyfriend you
dumped,
the neighbor whose lawn was soiled by your dog.
There’s the guy who killed his five children
because he was mad at his wife.

Or the quiet fellow you pass every day
who shot up the kids in the schoolyard with an arsenal
he picked up at the local gun show,
whom everyone said kept to himself and was so polite
you’d never imagine—

·    ·    ·

The Gun

Known as the AR-15
built in 1958
as a selective-fire weapon
for the military only
but sold to Colt
for civilian use
as a semi-automatic rifle
Popular among civilian shooters
due to their accuracy
light weight
auto-loading assault style
air-cooled
gas-operated
and magazine-fed
The most wanted gun in America,
there are  millions on the streets today.

·    ·    ·

Colt AR15A4

Orlando

A Plagiarism (after Jonathan Lethem)

Once again elegies, services, and memorials for the dead after yet another mass shooting in America brought about by the violent misuse of guns. The following is a collage of remarks about our “American Olympics of murder” from several voices around the country. Every word that follows has been said before in newspaper essays, speeches, sermons and addresses on the floor of Congress.

One person did that?
Yes…but with a weapon designed only for mass killings on the battlefield, a weapon so dangerous that soldiers keep their versions locked up when not actually training with it. …No one can ever eliminate violence in a modern society. …The success of the AR-15 has led to increasing militarization of the entire consumer firearms market in America. If we had gun laws like those of most countries that resemble ours we would have lower levels of gun violence. This massacre is therefore further reminder of how easy it is for someone to get their hands on a weapon that lets them shoot people in a school or in a house of worship or a movie theater or in a night club. Now there are speeches of condolences, the service for the dead, tears have been shed—and everyone goes home.

·    ·    ·

Acknowledgements:
Anonymous
Natasha Singer, The New York Times
The Guardian
Adam Gopnik, The New Yorker
Tom Diaz, Violence Policy Center
Congressman Christopher Murphy
and at the last, President Obama

http://marilynzuckermanpoet.com

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Behind the Scenes at Tonnemaker Hill Farm

Tonnemakers

By Dick Gillett

Business was brisk last Friday at the Phinney Farmers Market, with Rainier cherries piled high on the table at the Tonnemaker Farm stall. Serving the customers were Kayci and Alana, both from Seattle but both deeply familiar with operations at the 128-acre farm in eastern Washington. The Tonnemaker farm is big on fruit (including several varieties of cherries, with apricots and peaches coming in early to mid-July) and has 60 acres of orchards. A few of the cherry trees are three generations old and still producing. Speaking of generations: four generations of Tonnemaker farmers have farmed in eastern Washington.

Tonnemaker 2Fruit isn’t the only product you can find at their booth. In season are veggies from most of the rest of their acreage, including summer squash, tomatoes, rhubarb, zucchini and cucumbers. Last Friday, one table featured a variety of packaged organic peppers. “Our crops are rotated annually for soil preservation and also keep pests to a minimum,” says Kayci.

But who actually picks the cherries off the trees and the peppers from the plants? Writes a member of the farm team: “Our current harvest crew consists of 2 generations of Tonnemakers, a couple of local long time year-round employees, local high school and college students on summer break, Japanese Agricultural Exchange Trainees and a seasonally variable number of members of 3 Hispanic families, several of which have helped with the short but intense cherry harvest for more than 20 years. Everyone here from the top down is a picker of one crop or another. Hand harvesting crops is hard work and everyone here participates – even 80 year old Gene Tonnemaker insisted on donning a picking bag and pitching in.”

Whew!

Happily for us customers of Phinney Farmers Market, “Life is just a bowl of cherries.”

·     ·     ·

Please support your local Farmers Market! Today at the Phinney Neighborhood Center, 3:30-7:30 pm.

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Cheese, Goats, and Kids at the Phinney Farmer’s Market

By Richard Gillett

Cheese, Goats and Kids!

This goat farm is a family enterprise: Collin Medeiros, his wife Rebecca, and four children staffed the booth on opening day!

Attendance at the June 3 opening of the Phinney Farmer’s Market broke records in both revenue for the farmers ($23,729) and attendance (1975 people)!  Among the new vendors this year is Burton Hill Farms, a Grade A certified goat dairy farm on Vashon Island. The farm has 50 goats; 14 are currently milking.

Goat cheese is a specialty at Burton Hill, with naturally aged Feta Cheese and also a special blue cheese. But there’s also goat milk for lactose intolerant people, goat soap, and other products. Last Friday (June 10) was popular at the booth—I bought the last 4 oz. block of Feta fairly early on in the session (Market hours: 3:30-7:30).

Collin Medeiros told me that his 13 year old son George would be milking goats that evening. His five-year old, Peter, has a favorite goat—Mississippi.

So it seems that kids go together with kids!

Phinney Market

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Housing Affordability and Liveability Focus Groups

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Housing Affordability and Liveability Focus Groups
Monday, June 13, 6:30 to 7:45 PM
Sunday, July 31, 1-3 PM
Greenwood Public Library
8016 Greenwood Ave N

PNA Village Member Mary Holscher invites you to come to one or both of these community conversations about the Housing Affordability and Liveability Agenda (HALA) that she has scheduled at the Greenwood Public Library. Mary is a member of one of the newly-formed Focus Groups for HALA, along with four other people from the Greenwood/Phinney Ridge Urban Village. They are part of a Focus Group of about 40 people who live in or close by “Lower Density Urban Villages,” which also includes Madison-Miller, Morgan Junction, Ravenna, South Park, Upper Queen Anne, Wallingford, Westwood-Highland Park (outside area: Magnolia, Sand Point).

The Focus Group meets monthly at City Hall and is open to the public. Mary’s intention is to bring concerns and questions from people who live in our neighborhood to Focus Group discussions and also bring what she is learning about HALA to our neighborhood. She hopes to become a more informed and helpful HALA Focus Group member through talking with you. She looks forward to learning from you and sharing with you what she is learning!

Detailed information about HALA is at www.seattle.gov/hala.

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Save the Date! Summer BBQ & Potluck

Summer potluck 2015

Mark your calendars now for this favorite summer event at Ida Culver House Ravenna, sponsored by our program partner ERA living.

New Village members will have orientation before joining the potluck so you can help welcome them to our community!

PNA Village Summer BBQ & Potluck
Sunday, Aug. 7
1-3 pm
Ida Culver House Ravenna

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Social Calls

By Diana deParadis

A new option for Members is the Social Call where the Volunteer would offer a reassuring short check-in phone call or enjoy a longer, more sociable, chat. This Social Visit via telephone, email or texting is intended for those who are not as active as they would like to be, or who might feel a bit isolated from social contacts.

An important benefit is that there is total flexibility in choosing what kind of Social Call, the days and times agreed on by both Member and Volunteer. Another benefit is that there is no travel involved and the call can take place within the comfort of home, or if texting or emailing, it can happen anywhere.

A main requirement is that the Member must provide an emergency contact phone number to the Volunteer during the initial call.

This program will officially launch before mid-April and details will be posted in the PNA Village Newsletter and on the Village webpage.

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Cell Phones, Conversations, and the Common Good

The Working Class at Herkimer Coffee (pnavillage.org)

By Dick Gillett

It was crowded the other morning at Herkimer Coffee up on Greenwood Avenue.  I settled in at its long table with my machiatto and a book titled Private Equity at Work: When Wall Street Manages Main Street. (No, I’m not an investor or stockbroker but a retired clergyman trying to understand how economic inequality got so bad in our country.)

Opposite me sat a young man intently reading a paperback book. I immediately noticed that unlike almost everyone else in the café that day, he had no cellphone or other electronic device out, just his book. He appeared to be a “Millennial,”probably on the young end of that age spectrum. Maybe his book was a reading assignment for a class? I made bold to ask him what he was reading.

6751

“It’s a book of essays by David Foster Wallace,” he replied. He explained that the particular essay he was reading was a review of a new dictionary, and that in it Wallace was pointing out how issues of class and power in the modern era are affecting the use of words.

Wow, I thought, this is a subject that even as an English lit major I had never thought about.

Jesse (this man’s name) was not sure he bought the author’s argument.

His mention of the words “class” and “power” led me to comment that the previous night my son and I had watched a little of the Bernie Sanders-Hillary Clinton debate in a pub jammed with young people. “Did you watch the debate?” I asked Jesse.

“No, I had to work,” he responded.

Having pushed the conversation a little already, I resisted the temptation to turn to politics, so I asked him what his work is.

“I work as a host at a Sushi bar,”he said.

I rather lamely responded that I hoped he was doing okay.

“I’m doing OK,” he responded.

19524598We shook hands and I left the table.

Whether or not the politics of 2016 will bring us together as a country, I believe that we desperately need to recover a sense of the Common Good: that we are responsible for each other in our communities, and that “the moral arc of the universe… bends towards justice” (M.L. King).  Meanwhile, it felt very good to have even a brief conversation across the generations that finds common ground—especially without a cellphone lying on the table!

·     ·     ·

Author Dick Gillett is a Member of PNA Village and a retired Episcopal priest. He has written numerous articles for our Village blog including, “The Working Class at Herkimer Coffee”, “Martín’s Journey to the White House”,  and “Johnny Cash & Global Warming”.

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Swing Time

glenn-miller-and-his-orchestra-make-believe-ballroom-time-his-masters-voice

By Marilyn Zuckerman

For LW whose father would wake her, her sisters and brother
to swing music on Sunday mornings

1.

The Make Believe Ballroom

A Saturday night in 1941
and I was a sixteen year-old girl,
alone,
listening to Martin Block,
host of the Make Believe Ballroom
radio show, from Meadowbrook, NJ.
As the theme song,
“It’s Make Believe Ballroom Time,” played
I could see the brass section,
clarinets, trombones and saxophones
rise to the ceiling,
shimmering in the lights
as the platform rose up
revealing the band,
hear the wail of trumpets
as the singer,
Frank Sinatra or Dick Haymes
crooned songs drowning in sentiment
—all those war ballads
filled with yearning for when
The Boys Come Home Again.
While I danced alone,
I saw others
slow dancing
under the dazzle of revolving lights,
her head tucked under his chin,
they inch closer,
barely moving
as Sinatra,
with a catch in his voice, sings
“We’ll Meet Again.”

2.

Mary Alice and I
drinking cokes,
smoking our first cigarette
at Lambs Soda Fountain
across from our all-girls school,
gossiping about
schoolmates engaged to servicemen
while listening to Frankie sing,
“I’ll Never Smile Again.”
But deep in my heart
I wanted to be Anita O’Day
or Peggy Lee
draped across the piano,
my voice a low growl,
as I sing
We’ll meet again,
Don’t know where,
Don’t know when….

· · ·

Anita O'Day

Anita O’Day

Swing time

Adolescence in the 40’s meant one thing to the young men going off to war, while for the young women it was an era of waiting, of often going dateless on Saturday night, especially if you attended an all-girls school, as I did.

For many, The Make Believe Ballroom was a restorative filled with songs redolent with
loneliness and hopes for the future. A partial list of these songs includes, “We’ll Meet Again,” When the Lights Go On Again (All Over the World),” and swing music was the sweet thread that ran through through these longings. From Benny Goodman to Glenn Miller or Harry James with his skinny tenor Frank Sinatra singing his heart out, there was dancing in the aisles or sitting home alone and sighing.

http://marilynzuckermanpoet.com

Martin_block_stan_kenton_wnewedited

Stan Kenton & Martin Block at WNEW New York

Editor’s Note:

Hello, world! For a trip down memory lane and a quick listen to some of the music Marilyn references in her work above, check out the following links (clicking will take you off the PNA Village blog website):

“It’s Make believe Ballroom Time” performed by the Glenn Miller Orchestra
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DYQofQAQ3eE

1988 CBS Sunday “Make Believe Ballroom” Story WNEW 1130 New York
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dRV37DK1UC4

Vera Lynn sings “When the Lights Go On Again (All Over the World)”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vzlFaY0s_QI

Frank Sinatra sings “We’ll Meet Again”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x7q1r0LUXFI

Frank Sinatra sings “I’ll Never Smile Again”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pMaLvaPKPOY

Dick Haymes & Helen Forrest sing “It Had to Be You”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WW6Jd7zVpxM

Anita O’Day: The Life of a Jazz Singer (Documentary)
http://anitaodaydoc.com/

Peggy Lee & the Benny Goodman Orchestra: “Why Don’t You Do Right”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4zRwze8_SGk

Frank Sinatra & the Harry James Band “All Or Nothing At All”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u7klm1GS3v8

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