Safe and Sound in the Hospital

Did you know that medical errors in the hospital are the third leading cause of death in our country?¹ A successful hospital experience includes knowing what actions patients and their families should take.

Please join us for:

Safe & Sound in the Hospital: A Short Course on Patient Safety
Tuesday, July 25
10 am – noon
Greenwood Senior Center

RSVP to village@phinneycenter.org or 206-789-1217.

Participants will learn about some of the opportunities and challenges that hospitals face and what patients and their families can do to help. Bring a notebook to write down specific tips and tools that you can use when you or a loved one is in the hospital.

This content was compiled by and presented with permission of CampaignZERO, a non-profit organization dedicated to zeroing out preventable medical errors. (For more information visit campaignzero.org. )

¹ Journal of Patient Safety, Sept 2013 – Vol 9 – Issue 3 p 122-128.

PNA Swoosh

Barricaded

By Dick Gillett

As I stepped outside my front door last week, anticipating a delicious macchiato at Herkimer Coffee on Phinney Ridge, I was unexpectedly confronted by a barricade. About five or six feet across, it stretched across the handrails in front of me, its multiple strands caught by the morning sun. At its center was a spider, only half as big as the head of a pencil eraser—the architect and engineer.

My wife, ever-admiring of the skill and determination of spiders, was close by and counseled me to leave the spider’s work intact and go out by the back door. I scoffed at her suggestion and crashed through the barrier, the tiny spider sinking to the ground as its net fell.

At Herkimer, I made a full report of this incident to Chad, one of the baristas that I’ve known the longest. He heard me unsympathetically and scoffed at my accomplishment: “Greatest Generation, indeed!” he said.

I scoffed . . . and crashed through the barrier, the tiny spider sinking to the ground as its net fell.

Kelly, the other barista on duty, heard my story and made a face. She related that as a young girl a spider had been trapped in her ear, and later had been bitten by a spider. Little sympathy there, either.

A harmless incident, not worth the telling? Perhaps. Yet as we encounter more and more spider webs these summer months, both my wife and I continue to be astounded by how these tiny arachnids accomplish such immense engineering marvels, the materials for which emerge from their own bodies. Think of their ambition! Even more, ponder their willingness to get up and try again after going down with their creations. Are these lessons worth pondering in our complex and confounding world?

·     ·     ·

Author Dick Gillett is a Member of PNA Village, a retired Episcopal priest, and a regular contributor to our blog. His many articles include ““Generation Nice” at Herkimer Coffee”, “Martín’s Journey to the White House”,  and “Cell Phones, Conversations, and the Common Good”.

Do you like what you read on our blog? We’d love to hear from you! Please use the SHARE buttons below and COMMENT by clicking on “Leave a reply” or by clicking the gray dialogue bubble at the top right of each post!

PNA Swoosh

Village Game Group this Thursday

Do you have fond memories of playing board games with your family when you were a child, or as a parent? Or maybe you played word tile games with friends from school, or know folks who love playing games with number tiles or dominoes?

If any or all of the above apply to you, now is the time to check out the new PNA Village Game Group! No intense competition expected—just a fun time playing games together. We may have some of your old favorite games as well as ones that are new to you. You’re also welcome to bring your own favorite game!

Please join us on the 2nd Thursday of each month from 1:15 – 2:45 PM in the meeting room of the Broadview Branch of The Seattle Public Library.

SPL Broadview Branch
12755 Greenwood Ave N.

There is a parking lot available at the library. The location is also served by Metro bus routes 5, 345, 355.

(Event is not sponsored by The Seattle Public Library.)

PNA Swoosh

Back to the Future

(Photograph by Horace Warner-Spitalfields Life)

By Marilyn Zuckerman

Back to let them eat cake
to Oliver wants more
to orphans, hair shorn, lined up, plates out.
to the Dickensian streets
to children lining the tracks, picking up bits of coal,
swallowing down road kill rejected by dogs
—while Oliver slaves in the blacking factory
and Tiny Tim does die for lack of a doctor’s care.
Back to Scrooge, who never went away,
to child labor in the coal mines or coal factories
out of Blake’s dark satanic mills.
Back to typhoid and tuberculosis.
When all the owners care about is cost, people die.

Out of the mist, the fog and soot—
comes the pauper, the chimney sweep, the starveling—
with hungry eyes and dirty fingers,
pressed against the glass of the restaurant window
where you are eating your Christmas turkey.

Back to the return of charity,
of the sanctimonious charity of the wealthy—
like the dimes Henry Ford scattered to the crowd.
And who but Scrooge denies heat to the freezing,
aid to the famished and rest to the tired?

Back to that heartless century, in a soulless city.
To the workhouse with its iron gates,
To smokestacks against the sky
Back to those dank, back alleys where we have taken a journey
to a time and place that are becoming more familiar to us each day
for soon the brown air of London will be ours too.

·     ·     ·

This poem is from a collection called “Foreclosure”, written about collateral damage caused by the Recession of 2008 and it unfortunately appears to be even more relevant today.

http://marilynzuckermanpoet.com

PNA Swoosh

Your Village at the Phinney Farmers Market

Phinney logo
We’ll have an informational table at the Phinney Farmers Market tomorrow (Phinney Center Parking lot – 6532 Phinney Ave N), so please drop by to say hello!

Also, if you would like to help out with our table we have 2 shifts available: 3:30 – 5:30 PM and 5:30 – 7:30 PM. (If you can’t commit to a whole shift, no problem…we’d love to have you there just part of the time.) This is an awesome chance to talk to people who might not know about our wonderful village.

We will be there on the 3rd Friday of every month, so if you’re not available tomorrow but would like to help on another day, please let Rebecca know: call 206.789.1217 or email  rebeccaf@phinneycenter.org.

Hope to see you this Friday!

PNA Swoosh

A Mother’s Day Vigil

mothers-day-vigil-2017

Ninth Annual Mother’s Day Vigil at the Northwest Detention Center

By Teresa Burciaga & Dick Gillett

Dick and Teresa’s original article was published in the newsletter of Seattle’s St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church. The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the PNA. Please feel free to comment and join the conversation.  

On Saturday, May 13, more than 100 people gathered in Tacoma’s shabby industrial area, alongside the barbed wire-topped chain link fence surrounding a starkly nondescript prison: the Northwest Detention Center. After the crowd had laid down a mound of Mother’s Day bouquets near the fence, a Latino group played music and we prayed and chanted, hoping the prisoners inside would hear us and take heart. “No, No, No Basta Rezar,” the group sang, and we responded (No, it is not enough to pray).

We were gathered at the behest of the Church Council of Greater Seattle, the Interfaith Movement for Immigrant Justice, and the Washington Community Action Network. This was the 9th Annual Mother’s Day Vigil at the prison. The Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma is owned by the GEO Group, one of the largest security firms in the world—the same corporation that runs Guantanamo Bay.  It is the nation’s second largest for-profit prison operator, with a capacity for more than 1500 persons at the Tacoma facility.

“They are mothers and fathers who have lived alongside us. They are our neighbors.”

Emboldened by new policies under the current administration, the Immigration and Custom Enforcement (ICE) agency has stepped up raids. These sweeps include men and women who have no criminal record— mothers and fathers who have held jobs for over 20 years; who have American-born children—that are being detained and deported. Civil rights don’t extend to these immigrants being held at the Northwest Detention Center. They can be held there indefinitely.

“They are mothers and fathers who have lived alongside us,” stated Teresa Burciaga. “They are our neighbors. Their children go to school alongside ours. They hold jobs, sometimes as many as three to make a living—and pay Social Security and Medicare tax. They shop at our supermarkets and stores and pay sales tax. They are good, law-abiding people. Now their lives are in jeopardy.”

There were testimonies at the Vigil. One young mother spoke of her hope for a better life for herself and her family. Another mother, a United Methodist lay woman, told us she was there to remember and pray for her son, two years after he was deported to Mexico. Many immigrants come to this country to escape chronic poverty, criminal violence and government corruption. The prayerful community gathered at the Vigil stood in solidarity for love, justice and compassion. As their signs proclaimed, “Love has no borders, ” and “No one is free when other people are oppressed.”

We have an opportunity now to stand up for them and create more sanctuary cities and states. And we’ve recently learned that St. Mark’s Cathedral is proceeding to become a sanctuary church. Meanwhile, we in the faith communities might work to eventually close down this private prison, the Northwest Detention Center.

·     ·     ·

Author (Rev. Canon) Dick Gillett is a Member of PNA Village, a retired Episcopal priest, and a regular contributor to our PNA Village Connections blog. His many previous articles include, “Martín’s Journey to the White House”“”Generation Nice’ at Herkimer Coffee”, and “Johnny Cash & Global Warming.”

PNA Swoosh

Bella

Bella Abzug

By Marilyn Zuckerman

With her megaphone voice
threatening war
if there is not peace,
shouting a president
into banning above
ground bomb tests,
a Medusa of the vocal cords
a Minerva of pacifism
a postmodern Cassandra
cobbled together from an immigrant stew
and a New York mouth,
she stands before Senator Jake Javits
surrounded by cohorts of Amazons
in her bright red
lacquered straw hat
the light shards reflecting off it
dazzled straight into the eyes
of her antagonist
so he, unable to return the lightning
of hers,
ducks his head to scrape gunk
off his shoes.
Shame, she yells,
Think of all the children you are killing.
Outside a policeman on horseback asks,
Why don’t you women go home
take care of your kids
make dinner for the husband?

Once, lying on a bed at the Chelsea hotel,
I heard her voice over the strident traffic
shrieking, No More War!
loud enough for the pledge
to go echoing down 23rd St
cross the Hudson
and settle into the stones
of the Palisades
on the Jersey side.

·     ·     ·

Bella Abzug (1920/1998) was a leading feminist and anti-war activist who helped organize Women Strike for Peace during the Vietnam War. Abzug became a U.S. Congressperson from New York in 1971. In the poem, when she confronts Senator Javits, I was there and was with her when we were trying to get Senator Robert Kennedy nominated for President of the United States and hoped, as well, to end the Vietnam War and thus bring the veterans home.

From my book, In The Ninth Decade, from Red Dragonfly Press.

http://marilynzuckermanpoet.com

PNA Swoosh

Whale watching: San Juan Islands

By Marilyn Zuckerman

Moving slowly through the natural world,
trying to remember everything before it goes.
We count pelagic cormorants, auks, murres—
migrant seabirds down from Alaska for the summer,
watch the cormorant nursery, arranged along shelves
of a gently swinging bell buoy,
bald eagles lined up along crags
on the opposite shore.
Young auklets—swimming like amateurs—
divide, as we plow through them
and there are dolphins,
But not the killer whales
we’ve come to see.

From the tour boat,
video cameras scan the shore,
trying to get it all down—
the San Juan Islands,
Mt. Baker, Mt Rainer—
a polluted haze swirls around the summit
of the scalped mountain behind them
like a scarf covering
the hairless head of a cancer patient.
The scientist on board says
he doubts the same cataclysmic event,
creating the same bacterial scum
that become us and our whole world,
will ever happen again.

·       ·       ·

When I first wrote this poem, I had just moved from Boston to the Northwest and fell in love with its natural treasures—eagles barely saved from extinction, Puget Sound, the mountains, its forests, and the wonderful stock of wildlife.

Now as spring approaches after the long monsoon- like weather, leaving us in the rain and the dark, I am beside myself with happiness and sorrow wondering if we can keep this
Shangri-La and for how long?

The last lines of the poem speak of what that loss would mean to our children and grandchildren. Dedicated to Earth Day, everyday.

http://marilynzuckermanpoet.com

PNA Swoosh

Celebrating 15 Years of the Village Movement with Dr. Atul Gawande

PNA Village is proud to announce that renowned surgeon, public health researcher and writer Dr. Atul Gawande will be the guest speaker at the 15th Celebration of the founding of Beacon Hill Village and the subsequent Village Movement they inspired on Monday, February 13, 2017.

20696006His conversation, entitled “Being Mortal’s Villages: The Value of Community and Choice as we Grow Older,” will be moderated by Robin Young, host of NPR’s Here & Now, and feature a discussion on aging, living life with purpose, and how we can transform the possibilities for the later chapters in everyone’s lives. The live event will begin at 2pm PST and be simulcast from Boston to more than 150 of the 350-plus villages open and in development across the country, including the PNA Village.

All are welcome to join the PNA Village for a viewing party and subsequent conversation facilitated by Cecile Andrews, author of Living Room Revolution: A Handbook for Conversation, Community, and the Common Good.

The Village Movement is a burgeoning, world-wide movement that champions an alternative approach for adults as they grow older. Villages are unique in that they are created by and for older adults, empowering their members to make wise, safe, and vibrant choices about how they wish to live.

WHEN:  Monday, February 13, 2017; 1:30 – 4:00 PM
WHERE:  Phinney Neighborhood Center, Brick Building, Community Hall
6532 Phinney Ave N, Seattle, WA 98103 (parking and elevator)

Phinney Books1 will be at the event with copies of Being Mortal for purchase. Cash or credit cards accepted.

Please bring a snack or dessert to share and RSVP at 206-789-1217 or village@phinneycenter.org

PNA Swoosh

What YOU Can Do For Our Newsletter

PNA Village Connections newslettersAre you interested in writing, editing, desktop publishing, or even seeing your writing featured on our blog? If so, we’d love to hear from you!

You can help your PNA Village Connections newsletter in any of the following ways:

  • Join us! The newsletter committee meets just four times per year for a planning session. You choose what you’d like to write and/or what tasks you can do. (You’ll need access to a reliable computer and the Internet, as this is the committee’s primary mode of communication.)
  • Suggest ideas or information you’d like to see covered in our newsletter and/or blog.
  • Write! We’re always looking for new topics to cover.
  • Take photos! Take photos of Village events and activities.
  • Help us mail the newsletter. We always can use help folding and preparing the newsletter for mailing.
  • Provide technical help. Two of our prime needs right now are for a person comfortable doing page layout for the printed version of the newsletter (using InDesign, Publisher or Word) as well as a person comfortable preparing the newsletter for email distribution using Vertical Response.

If any of these things sound interesting to you, please contact the Village office at 206-789-1217.

PNA Swoosh