PNA Village to the Rescue!

Carol Gives Marguerite a Lift: PNA Village Drivers

By Marguerite Langlois

I became a member of the Village about a year and a half ago, to support the new community and to support my commitment to myself to stay in my home as I age. It didn’t take long for me to discover ways I could get help, like emptying a room before it was remodeled, or doing things on step ladders, which I don’t do anymore, or getting help finding reliable contractors. I also met new friends at the potlucks. And I’ve been able to contribute as well, by writing for the Village blog and teaching at the Greenwood Senior Center.

Then, about three months ago, I fell, seriously injured my neck and shoulder, and was suddenly unable to drive. I not only couldn’t do things like getting groceries or running errands or doing personal business, I also had multiple medical appointments to deal with. I sent off requests to Liz (our amazing AmeriCorps volunteer), and, one by one, volunteers arrived at my home to get me where I needed to be. And these weren’t just rides…they were great chances to meet new people and enjoy good conversation…at a time when usual chances for that in my life were diminished. A volunteer also came to my home to help with some clearing and sorting and rearranging that I had planned to do myself and could no longer do.

I’m doing better now, but an injury like mine can quickly diminish your life. I don’t know what I would have done without the Village in my life these past few weeks. Instead of being cut off and shut in, I find myself in the middle of a village…a group of people caring, sharing, and expanding my life. I intend to be a lifelong member!

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A note from Liz Waesche, our AmeriCorps volunteer:

The PNA Village would be nothing without our wonderful volunteers! As the Village continues to grow, our group of volunteers needs to grow with it, especially our group of Village Drivers. Village Drivers have a huge impact on the health and well-being of members. Drivers use their own vehicles to transport Village Members to doctors’ appointments, the grocery store, to movies, and everywhere in-between (as long as the ride is within Seattle City limits). Some, but not all, drivers lift wheel chairs or walkers into a car or trunk. Volunteers choose when or how often they want to drive. In 2013, the Village Drivers provided members with 138 rides, so drivers are definitely in high demand!

So, if you know someone who has made it their New Year’s resolution to spend more time volunteering or who loves driving, contact Liz, 206.789.1217, or lizw@phinneycenter.org for more information. It takes less than an hour to become a Village Driver, but the impact on a member can be felt for a long time.

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Happy New Year: Instant Book Delivery Available!

By Marguerite Langlois

Keep Calm and Browse Inside

You’ve probably seen the news about Amazon wanting to use drones to deliver books (or other orders) to customers’ homes within a half-hour. And you heard what the weather did to some holiday gift deliveries. Well, we had to share this with you: we know how you can get instant book delivery! That’s right…the minute you request the book. It’s a strange but amazing institution called…your local bookstore!

Of course, you do have to go there. But that just means that you get added physical and mental health benefits free with your visit! (Can’t drive? Remember, we have Village volunteer drivers who will happily get you there…they like doing this kind of thing too!)

So, with this in mind, we bring you again our “directions for shopping for a book.” Our cold, grey winter days are prime “reading season,” time to curl up with a good book.  Enjoy!

1.  Pick your local favorite bookstore. Right here in our Village neighborhood, we are fortunate to have two delightful ones: Santoro’s and Couth Buzzard Books. We’re also near Secret Garden Books just down the hill in Ballard, and not too far from Third Place Books in Ravenna, on the other side of Green Lake.

2.  Dress comfy. This may take a while. And there is no dress code for bookstores.

3.  Coffee or tea or goodies for fuel? Couth Buzzard has them in-house; Santoro’s is right across the street from Caffe Vita, Herkimer’s Coffee, Bluebird Microcreamery & Brewery…

4.  When you enter the bookstore – this is important – do not, repeat, do not head immediately to the shelves that hold a specific book you might be looking for. Pause to take in the atmosphere, the special smell of books, the sense of all those ideas and stories waiting for you. Meander. You never know what you’ll find. My library holds many wonderful books I’ve found on the way to something else.

5.  Most bookstores are somewhat quiet places, but if you are near another shopper who is looking at a book you’ve enjoyed, nothing wrong with smiling and saying “Oh, I loved that one, especially….” Bookstores are one of those places where we can still make those mini-connections with people who like the same things we do, and for a moment or two share things we like or laugh about or enjoy learning.

6.  Do use the comfy chairs you see. They are not just for resting. They are for “trying on” books. Go ahead, take one or two or three books to a chair, sit, and see what you’ve got. It’s one of the best ways to choose a book. For myself, I know that if I find I’ve read most of a chapter, well, obviously I need that book!

7.  Pay and take home your books right away…instant delivery…as you leave!

8.  Share! Brag! Tell all your friends and relations what a great time you had, and how easy it is to get books without waiting!

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Aging in the 21st Century

A NEW CLASS AT GREENWOOD SENIOR CENTER

Gazebo | ©2013 HouseofHank.me

How is aging different in the 21st century – and what can we do about it?

What does it mean to be “retired” for up to 30 years? What do instant news, science advances, enormous amounts of information, and a volunteer force of literally millions have to do with it? What are our needs as we age now? We’ll start with a look back at the 20th century, discuss questions like these, and talk about what we want for our aging in the 21st century. Come to learn new perspectives, enjoy discussion, and think about our role in all this. (If you were at the spring ”History of Aging” class, you’ll enjoy this as a follow-up – but you don’t need that prior class to enjoy this new one!)

No fee, pre-registration suggested: 206-297-0875.

Class at Greenwood Senior Center
(Two sessions, two hours each)
Dec. 4 and 11, 1:00 – 3:00 pm

·    ·    ·

ALSO ON DEC. 4: THE SENIOR CENTER COSTUME JEWELRY SALE, 11 – 3

Come early, enjoy the sale, and join the class at 1:00!

·    ·    ·

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Marguerite Langlois has 50 years of education experience with community and church groups, businesses, and individuals. While she was teaching at Shoreline Community College, she designed and taught a program titled “Engaging Aging,” on topics important to all of us as we age. Marguerite currently does part-time classes for staff training and development at the University of Washington, as well as continuing her classes on aging. There’s nothing she likes better than a lively group where learning is shared and enjoyable.

Marguerite is a member of PNA, the Village, and GSC.

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Movie and Book Reviews: Toxins in our Environment

By Marguerite Langlois

Can we change the way chemicals influence our home life? What’s the state of our environmental health?

About 40 people gathered at Greenwood Senior Center (GSC) on Sept. 27 to view the movie “Chemerical,” part of GSC’s “Meaningful Movies” series. Leading with the theme of “defining clean for a new generation,” the movie told the story of one family’s journey from using multiple toxic chemicals to using only non-toxic materials as part of their daily lives. Along the way, added commentary provided some history of how we got to our current over-use of toxic chemicals in our homes. Handouts provided resources and ways to make your own safe products.

Chemerical movie poster

I liked the movie because it didn’t preach. It was practical, down-to-earth, and encouraging. Yes, we can make changes in how we use chemicals in our daily lives. And, we can do it one step at a time. The movie family did it all within a few weeks, as part of the making of the documentary. But anyone can begin with a few simple changes: start simply with using fewer products: if you have 15 or 20 of them, cut down to the 4 or 5 that have the lowest toxicity. Experiment with using products like baking soda and vinegar to make an effective scrubbing cleaner (I’ve done if for years. It cleans even the worst messes out of my oven.) Start anywhere…but do start. Several practical handouts were available with further information.

If you’d like to rent the movie or get the handouts for your family or group, contact Shannon Markley at GSC: 206-297-0875.

Here’s a link to the trailer: http://www.chemicalnation.com/content/take-action-tools
You may also view the entire movie online on Vimeo: http://vimeo.com/73713227

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The Rise of the U.S. Environmental Health Movement
By Kate Davies
(Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2013)

The Rise of the U.S. Environmental Health MovementIn discussing the history of environmental issues, the movie told the story of Love Canal, the neighborhood in New York state build on a toxic waste dump. Residents were not told about the dangers. But mothers noticed…they noticed how often their children got ill, with serious health problems. Lois Gibbs, one of the mothers and president of the homeowners’ association, petitioned the school board to investigate, got other families involved, learned the truth about the chemicals and their effects, and in the process made history for their actions.

The Love Canal story is also told in The Rise of the U.S. Environmental Health Movement, by Kate Davies, just published this past summer. When Kate was 8, her mother developed cancer, and Kate decided then that she would do something about things that made people sick. Her mother survived, and Kate kept and strengthened her interest, eventually working with a number of major groups involved in environmental health. The book tells in detail the history of the environmental health movement, and what individuals like Lois Gibbs, and an ever-growing number of groups, have done and are doing to change the chemical toxicity of our homes, our buildings, our cities, our environment. Kate, currently core faculty in Antioch University’s Center for Creative Change, has worked extensively in environmental health.

When Kate was 8, her mother developed cancer, and Kate decided then that she would do something about things that made people sick.

The book provides valuable information on the chemical industry, legislation (or lack of legislation), and the various issues and organizations involved. It’s a fascinating story that touches each of our lives and communities. Kate discusses key issues, such as the “burden of proof” concept: currently, in the US, products are considered safe until someone proves they are harmful, instead of the burden of proof being on the company to prove a product safe before distribution.

There’s a practical path for anyone who wants to be part of change, whether you want to work with an established group, start a small group, or work individually. Extensive discussion of organizations, movements, and progress provide readers with multiple ways to begin and develop involvement. Kate reassures us that there is hope: it will take years, but think of the years it took to gain the vote for women, or civil rights. Anything we can do is a step forward, and we need to take our place in a long chain of those who have worked and continue to work so that we can all live more healthy lives and leave a legacy of health for our children and future generations.

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Find this book!

Seattle Public Library: http://seattle.bibliocommons.com/item/show/2869236030_the_rise_of_the_us_environmental_health_movement

IndieBound: http://www.indiebound.org/book/9781442221376

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17293919-the-rise-of-the-u-s-environmental-health-movement?from_search=true

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Book Review: “Women to Women”

Book Review by Marguerite Langlois

Women to Women Cover

Women to Women: A Handbook for Active Aging, by Catharine Stewart-Roache and Barbara Yarnell
(Hermosa Publishers, 2009)

Although this book is written by and about women, men will find it useful too! This is a practical and encouraging book about real people finding ways to add movement and stay active in their lives on a day by day basis. You’ll meet and hear from both authors, Catharine Stewart-Roache and Barbara Yarnell, who share their own stories along with their ideas, information, and suggestions for staying healthy in simple, practical ways. The book includes basic health information related to aging, practical ideas for paying attention to your own health, food suggestions, and different ways to keep moving and exercising.

To help you with building your own personal program, the authors offer suggestions for creating a plan and charting what you want to do. I like the way they encourage you to really make this your own plan, doing whatever works best for you. At this point in my life, I know that I often ignore or get discouraged by all the stuff written about exercise for seniors, giving us unrealistic examples and ignoring personal differences, so I truly appreciated these authors’ emphasis on doing what works for me. Yes, there are some women doing things I will never do…but I can find my way and I appreciated the photos of these women. They will never appear in most fitness magazines! Instead, we meet and see them as they really are, with all their differences. They clearly feel at home in their own bodies, which is something we all need to be encouraged to do.

If you’re looking for ways to move in your own way and want to meet others who are doing so too, this book will provide you with some realistic tools and motivation.

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Find this book!

Seattle Public Library: (SPL does not currently own this book)

IndieBound: (IndieBound does not currently list this book)

Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/18376510-women-to-women

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Catharine-Stewart-Roache/e/B001KCGJ48/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0
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The Room a Village Built

Help arrives! Where are we going to put stuff?

Help arrives!

By Marguerite Langlois

Wow!

That, I said in an email to Katie, the Americorps volunteer for our PNA Village, is about the best way to describe what happened in my house on Friday, March 8.

I had what seemed an overwhelming task: empty my home office space so the room could be re-done. It was definitely not something I could do alone, but I knew from experience what to do: call the Village! Village volunteers Dennis, Mary, and Deb arrived right at the scheduled time. I explained the project, and the things we could leave if they were too difficult to move.

And then they organized what had to be done, went to work, and in just a little over an hour my home office was empty! Dennis had brought a hand truck, so he even moved my files. They had to find room for everything in my living-dining room…and somehow they did. They even got my computer disconnected and unplugged, moved it to my dining table, and got it all reconnected and plugged in again. My printer too.

Help arrives

We actually felt like it was a party! Carol arrived near the end to see how things were going, brought brownies, and later dropped off donations to Goodwill. A big messy chore turned into a lot of fun, and was so well done. And when I thanked them all, they also thanked me.

Then it was time for phase two: having the contractors come in.

Before: dark, cramped, wall needs repair after new electric panel

BEFORE: dark, cramped, wall needs repair after new electric panel

When I started planning the project, I also asked the Village for a referral for a contractor. I was referred to August at Crescent Builds. A couple of meetings with him and his wife Emilee, who helps with decorating, convinced me that I wanted them to do the work. All my questions were clearly answered, they provided detailed information right from the start, and were very considerate of what my physical needs would be during the project.

So after the room was emptied, they began. Because I have to be careful about breathing dust, they sealed off the room. They vacuumed daily, and they kept my heating filters clean. I was impressed with everything they did, especially with the high quality of their work, and their attentiveness to me and my needs during the project. Over the three weeks they were here, I got to know a number of August’s group: Emilee, Ned, Brendan, Adam, Richard, Noel. They are really “Village people”…it’s clear that care and community are a value in all they do.

Contractor work begins

Contractor work begins

Emilee helped with color, carpet, and lighting choices, and I enjoyed her creativity and expertise with the process. I didn’t have to go out to shop: either she came here, or sent me things by email. Then as the work got going, Richard became the project manager, gave me his cell phone number, and told me to call anytime. One by one, people showed up, and got things done. Every bit of painting, carpeting, building, every last screw, each aspect of trim, things done twice if needed (I live in one of those old Ballard houses…there were surprises!)—all of it demonstrated their insistence on doing things well. They were on time, or they called. And they paid a lot of attention to my comfort and well-being, every day: doing various aspects of the project at a different time if needed, being sure absolutely nothing from the project got left in other areas of the house, asking if I needed anything. They had to move one of my smoke detectors—and then they changed the batteries too!

Done: Light, color, space!

DONE! Light, color, space!

As everyone knows who has done it, remodeling is not necessarily a pleasant task, especially when major living areas are disrupted. But along with that, this whole project became a happy experience for me, and a memorable one. NW Spotless Cleaning (another Village referral) did an amazing job both at the beginning and end of the project.

I now work, communicate, and read every day in what is truly a room the Village built!

This is an amazing community we have. I’ve both benefited from it and have been happy I could contribute, too. Recently we celebrated the Village’s first anniversary—with a party attended by about 100 people. PNA, the larger community of which we are a part, recently celebrated its 30th year. I hope to be at the party when the Village celebrates that anniversary too! (Hmm….I’d be 100! Well, why not. I’d like being a Village centenarian!)

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Book Review: “Independent for Life”

INDEPENDENT FOR LIFE: Homes and Neighborhoods for an Aging America
Ed. by Henry Cisneros, Margaret Dyer Chamberlain, and Jane Hickie
(University of Texas Press, 2012)

By Marguerite Langlois

Independent for LifeIndependent for Life is many things: source book, report on research, practical guide, discussion of issues, and conversation starter. It does all those things well, and its title just happens to be one of the main goals for our PNA Village!

Cisneros, Chamberlain, and Hickie have done something long overdue. They have researched, gathered ideas, worked with a number of individual authors, and talked with people all over the country to find out what is really needed for healthy, engaged living for seniors, and to see what’s missing, what’s not working, and especially what is working. As a result, you can look at any few pages in the book and find ideas that you can use or which you might want to discuss with others. And because the book was written just last year, it takes into consideration the added stresses brought by the recession.

There is clearly a great deal of creativity, time, innovation, and effort happening in many places in the country, and this book is the first effort of its kind to put them together and share them.

The book has 5 sections: Independence and successful longevity, demographics and challenges, housing and services, homes as we age, neighborhoods, and strategies for change. Each section discusses issues, solutions, and real experiences and examples of what’s happening. There’s also an excellent 10-page reference section, including connections with local, state, and national agencies, as well as the many other groups mentioned in the book.

I do have one problem with the book – one that is unfortunately true for a lot written about aging: the book speaks in what I call “they” language. It talks about, not with, seniors, as “this group” that needs help and will affect our neighborhoods, our cities, our societies as a whole, rather than using language that includes the voices of seniors. That said, however, this is one of the most hopeful and creative books yet published on aging independently in our neighborhoods and communities. There is clearly a great deal of creativity, time, innovation, and effort happening in many places in the country, and this book is the first effort of its kind to put them together and share them.

And the best part for us “villagers”? We know we are actually participating in it! We are building a community, creating chances to help and be helped, making social connections. What about you? What has the village meant for you in these first few months of its existence?

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Find this book!

Seattle Public Library: http://seattle.bibliocommons.com/item/show/2830426030_independent_for_life

IndieBound: http://www.indiebound.org/book/9780292737914

Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/13699160-independent-for-life

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Speaking of how we age, and how we participate, your intrepid book reviewer will be teaching a class at Greenwood Senior Center called “Does Aging Have a Future?” starting in March.

When did “aging” become a separate phase of life? What was it like being old several centuries ago? How did a rising middle class, the Industrial Revolution, the Depression, and world wars change concepts of aging? We’ll explore how ideas and images and ideas about aging have changed and developed over time. Then we’ll look at our own ancestors. We’ll finish by talking about how we ourselves are creating and changing what it means to age. Interesting questions and discussions included!

The class will be Wednesdays, March 1 through March 22, 1:00 – 2:30; $15. Call or email GSC to RSVP; drop-ins welcome.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Marguerite Langlois has over 40 years of education experience with community and church groups, businesses, and individuals. While she was teaching at Shoreline Community College, she designed and taught a program titled “Engaging Aging,” on topics important to all of us as we age. Marguerite currently does part-time classes for staff training and development at the University of Washington, as well as continuing her classes on aging. There’s nothing she likes better than a lively group where learning is shared and enjoyable.

Marguerite is a member of PNA, the PNA Village, and GSC.

HOW TO SHOP FOR A BOOK

A Holiday “Book Review” by Marguerite Langlois

Open Books | 2012 ©HouseofHank.me

‘Tis the season for looking for a special something for a special someone – even perhaps for ourselves. So, along with – or maybe instead of – all the other shopping ideas we are getting, it seemed like a good idea to review the directions for shopping for a book. (Next month we’ll get back to our regular book review.)

1.  Pick your local favorite bookstore. Right here in our Village neighborhood, we are fortunate to have two delightful ones: Santoro’s Books and Couth Buzzard Books.

2.  Dress comfy. This may take a while. And there is no dress code for bookstores.

3.  Coffee or tea or goodies for fuel? Couth Buzzard has them in-house at Espresso Buono Cafe; Santoro’s is right across from Herkimer Coffee and Caffé Vita.

4.  When you enter the bookstore – this is important – do not, repeat, do not head immediately to the shelves that hold a specific book you might be looking for. Pause to take in the atmosphere, the special smell of books, the sense of all those ideas and stories waiting for you. Meander. You never know what you’ll find. My library holds many wonderful books I’ve found on the way to something else.

Lovely Selection | 2012 ©HouseofHank.me

5.   Most bookstores are somewhat quiet places, but if you are near another shopper who is looking at a book you’ve enjoyed, nothing wrong with smiling and saying “Oh, I loved that one, especially….” Bookstores are one of those places where we can still make those mini-connections with people who like the same things we do, and for a moment or two share things we like or laugh about or enjoy learning.

6.   Do use the comfy chairs you see. They are not just for resting. They are for “trying on” books. Go ahead, take one or two or three books to a chair, sit, and see what you’ve got. It’s one of the best ways to choose a book. For myself, I know that if I find I’ve read most of a chapter, well, obviously, I need that book!

Read like a Lion | 2012 ©HouseofHank.me

7.   Want to make a bookseller’s day? Ask yours to order a book for you. Yes, it’s old-fashioned (but, umm, don’t we know all about those old ways?), and you may pay a bit more…but you’re helping to preserve a neighborhood treasure.

8.   Share! Brag! Tell all your friends and relations what a great time you had!

Vast Options | ©2012 HouseofHank.me

Selection 2 | 2012 ©HouseofHank.me

PNW Authors | ©2012 HouseofHank.me

And speaking of sharing, here’s a question for Village blog readers: What book would you like to get as a gift this holiday season? Or perhaps: What book was a special gift you received at some point in your life?

Tell us about it in the “Leave a Reply” box below!

Candy Cane Window Shopping | 2012 ©HouseofHank.me

Book Review: “Getting to Yes”

Getting to YES: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving InGETTING TO YES: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In, by Roger Fisher and William Ury, with Bruce Patton for revised editions
(Penguin Book, 2011 edition)

Book Review by Marguerite Langlois

With this book review, I want to pay tribute to Roger Fisher, Professor Emeritus at Harvard University, who died August 25 at 90 years old, still engaged in his work. He played a role in drafting the Camp David accords between Egypt and Israel and in ending apartheid in South Africa.

_________________________________

Getting to Yes was first published in 1981, has been translated into many languages, and has been in constant print since that time. In 1983, Ury, Fisher, and Patton, building on seminal work they had done on conflict resolution, founded the Harvard Project on Negotiation. While they all have engaged in national and international negotiations, their focus is the conviction that negotiation and conflict resolution skills are badly needed in our world at all levels, from individuals through families and communities to international relations.

…this is not about giving up who we are or what we want or need; it’s about finding a path that works for us.

Getting to Yes is a road map, a practical down-to-earth primer, and a thoughtful discussion on conflict in all of our lives. It guides readers through a step-by-step process, based on “using principles, not positions,” for working through large and small issues, with multiple examples. As we all know, aging brings its own conflicts – perhaps with families and friends, with individuals and groups of people involved in our lives, and with institutions and organizations. I’ve used the book in teaching for many years, and each time I do, I am both encouraged and comforted by its reassurance that this is something we can get through. I like the subtitle too: “Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In.” In other words, this is not about giving up who we are or what we want or need; it’s about finding a path that works for us.

Getting to Yes was the first publication of this group; there is now a whole series of books (all in paperback) on various aspects of conflict resolution and building strengths for ourselves in the process: Getting Together: Building Relationships As We Negotiate; Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most; The Third Side: Why We Fight and How We Can Stop; and others. You can find them at your favorite bookstore and see the complete list on the Project on Negotiation website (http://www.pon.harvard.edu/).

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/313605.Getting_to_Yes

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Find this book!

Seattle Public Library: http://seattle.bibliocommons.com/item/show/1356162030_getting_to_yes

IndieBound: http://www.indiebound.org/book/9780143118756

Book Review: “The Mature Mind”

The Mature Mind: The Positive Power of the Aging Brain THE MATURE MIND: The Positive Power of the Aging Brain, by Gene Cohen M.D. (Basic Books, 2006)

Review by Marguerite Langlois

Drawing on his medical practice, his deep interest in the processes of aging, and his experience in his own life and others’ lives, Cohen wrote this book to describe and define the aging process as a developmental phase of life instead of decline. When it was published just a few years ago, it was one of the first books to combine research results and life experiences to counter still unfortunately widespread ideas about what happens to our minds as we age.

“The complex neural architecture of older brains built over years of experience, practice, and daily living, is a fundamental strength of older adults.”

Cohen goes beyond “if you use it, you won’t lose it” to describe real development, not just prevention of loss. He gives examples and ideas on creating new approaches to learning, developing different types of social connections, using our memories and experiences as a basis for further development of wisdom, and continuing to actively create our lives. His descriptions of what we can do for community and what community can do for us reminded me of our developing community as the Village.

One important note: Cohen wrote this book in 2005, before the recession, when more people were assured of “golden years” of financial freedom. So some of his descriptions about what we can do with our retirement years don’t quite fit with current financial experiences and the need to redefine that word “retirement.”

In the seven years since this book was published, more and more is being written about this time of life we call “aging” or “senior” or “elder.” Our culture tends to think of us and label us as “getting old” from 60 or so onward – labeling us that way for a span of 30 or 40 or more years, ignoring all the nuances and development. With experiences like the Village and our individual lives, we are saying that there’s way more to it than that. Cohen’s thoughtful and questioning book provides good basis for further exploration.

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/112092.The_Mature_Mind

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Find this book!

Seattle Public Library: http://seattle.bibliocommons.com/item/show/2326663030_the_mature_mind

IndieBound: http://www.indiebound.org/book/9780465012046